Miscellaneous Public Correspondence & Articles

970431_525134077547680_1060627441_n

Advertisements

38 Responses to Miscellaneous Public Correspondence & Articles

  1. http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Articles&ArticleID=15474
    Talking Culture with British Poet Louis Kasatkin by Sunil Sharmaboloji.comA lively discussion about arts and politics affecting British society with one of its happening critical voices

  2. Dear Contributor,
    We are glad to inform you that your poem/s has been published in our online journal Episteme, Vol. 2(4), March 2014.
    Web address: http://bharatcollege.in/episteme-cover
    Thank you for your intellectual contribution,
    With regards and best wishes,

  3. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 18 / 01 / 2003 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:18
    Poets leading cultural field
    Published on the18January 2003 07:00

    Re your article “Culture control” wherein you report on Wakefield’s bid to attain a certain status.
    Your report refers to a 12-year strategy for culture. It all rather smacks of the former Communist East Germany – quite fitting, since the Labour party, which has led Wakefield into the doldrums, appears to have concocted an overblown piece of propaganda.
    I see lots of references to individuals born or schooled in Wakefield who A, have no actual interest in Wakefield’s culture or B, are long dead and forgotten.
    There is no instance of a thriving performance poetry scene every bit as important and successful as anything in London or major metropolitan centre.
    After a year as poet-in-residence at Wakefield Trinity (Barnsley FC apart), the only other known residency of its kind anywhere is the post of p-i-r created at Wakefield Cathedral – due to the considerable foresight of the Dean of Wakefield.
    Now as The Cathedral Poets, five of us are again leading the cultural field.
    And where is the actual support from the political arena? Wakefield, because of these people, has one hand tied behind its back, out shone by places even like that sheep town of the Pennines, Ilkley.
    LOUIS KASATKIN, Poet-in-Residence, Wakefield Cathedral

  4. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 21 / 10 / 2003 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:12
    Rugby League tackled in verse
    Published on 21October 2003 11:36

    THE bruising, rough and tumble world of Rugby League is being turned into poetry.
    It is being put into words and images by the Cathedral Poets, a group based at Wakefield Cathedral.
    An exhibition, This Sporting Life – Heritage and Community, will open at Treacy Hall in the cathedral grounds on October 31.
    Cathedral poet-in-residence Louis Kasatkin, who has held similar posts at Wakefield Trinity Wildcats and Castleford Tigers, said the launch would be attended by the Bishop of Wakefield, the Right Rev Stephen Platten, the Mayor of Wakefield, Coun David Atkinson, and Wakefield MP David Hinchliffe, a lifelong Wakefield Trinity supporter.
    Members of the Australia and New Zealand ‘A’ touring teams are also expected.
    Mr Kasatkin said: “This is a truly groundbreaking exhibition of words and images focusing on Rugby League and its meaning and relevance to the people and community from which it developed.”
    He said the words would be provided by the Cathedral Poets and the images by sports photographers Dave Williams and Sig Kasatkin.

  5. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 13 / 01 / 2005 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:24
    Lewd, smug, amoral…that’s the BBC
    Published on 13January 2005 14:09

    I have followed the Jerry Springer debate in your letters column and elsewhere with mounting anger and incredulity.
    I happen to believe that Jesus Christ is Lord and that he is my only hope of eternal salvation. Whether anyone else at all believes likewise is, in strictly theological terms, of no consequence to me.
    As for equivocating, extemporising, apologetic “Christians”, how can anyone standing on the incontrovertible surety of the Gospels be such a scaredy-cat?
    As for the amoral, asocial, preening, smug, self-satisfied, swaggering, empty-headed, posturing, publicity-subsidised reprobates that constitute the entirety of the BBC would do well to read St Paul: “When I was a child, I thought as a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, but when I became a man I put aside childish things.”
    Clearly the BBC and its proponents need to grow up and soon.
    LOUIS KASATKIN, Wakefield

  6. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 03 / 12 /2007 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:29
    Literary omission
    Published on the03December 2007 11:35

    THE reading skills of British schoolchildren is in decline. Ministers of the Labour government have accepted this without dispute.
    Apparently there will be a National Literacy Year forthcoming. All well and all to the good, apparently. In order to facilitate openness, transparency and public accountability, for which this government is justly famed. Would Ed Balls, Yvette Cooper, Mary Creagh and Jon Trickett please explain why Wakefield Council has categorically excluded the literary arts and artists from the official council cultural strategy document? We really would like to hear from them.
    LOUIS KASATKIN

  7. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 14 / 07 / 2008 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:35
    Orwell and the wasted millions
    Updated on the14July 2008 12:27
    Published 14/07/2008 12:26

    Not even George Orwell at his most prophetic and insightful would have dared describe a government – sorry a tyrannical regime – like the one we have now.
    Their latest PC mantra is “stop wasting food.” OK, I’ll stop wasting food if this regime stops wasting billions on computerised systemsthat never work, billions on let’s pretend we’re all skivers who don’t want to work and I’ll even stop smoking if New Labour’s war criminals stop imprisoning wannabe poets on terrorism charges and assisting the US in bombing villages in Afghanistan.
    Deal or no deal?
    LOUIS KASATKIN, Wakefield

  8. Public correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 31 / 10 / 2007 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:38
    Council’s cultural oversight
    Published on the31October 2007 13:18

    YOUR coverage of Wakefield strikes me like an anglicised version of Kim Jong-Il’s North Korean media.
    For example, Wakefield Council’s 30-page ‘Cultural Strategy’ document seems to have escaped public attention. Claiming to be the definitive view of Wakefield’s cultural heritage and ongoing development, it makes no mention of the literary arts and artists.
    In 30 pages of council paid-for waffle, it neglects to mention anything, of Gissing, Storey, Barstow, Godber, etc.
    The only question Wakefield Council need be pressed on is: is the exclusion of Wakefield’s world-class literary heritage on oversight by ignorance or just plain deliberate?
    LOUIS KASATKIN

  9. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 21 / 01 / 2008 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:43
    Great Olympic con trick?
    Updated on the21January 2008 11:06
    Published 21/01/2008 11:05

    YOUR comment on “Olympic losers” or how Yorkshire folk are helping to pay for London’s pastimes, is very timely.
    The metropolitan ruling elite with its intellectual cronies have perpetrated the most massively outrageous confidence trick on what they still refer to as “the provinces”.
    No-one can still figure out how a much worthier city such as Paris or Madrid didn’t get the nod for 2012, so whether by connivance or chance, our London ruling elite got its hands on a proverbial goldmine. Clearly they want us to have a share in the Olympic goldmine on the basis of they get the gold and Yorkshire and everywhere else gets the shaft.
    Louis Kasatkin

  10. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 14 / 03 / 2008 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:46
    No place for book lovers
    Published on the14March 2008 12:43

    I was overwhelmed by jealousy on reading about the Headingley Lit Fest. How wonderful it must be to be in a city that actually cares about the literary arts. Leeds really does well, unlike its culturally impoverished near-neighbour Wakefield.
    Despite having a feasible proposal on its desk for nearly three years, Wakefield chose not to pursue a Gissing Festival. Despite boasting not only Gissing, but Storey and Godber and the Black Horse Poets, Wakefield Council excluded the literary arts and artists from its five year-cultural strategy.
    What might Mr Balls say, were he remotely interested, of his local council’s policy of throttling the literary arts in the year he declared National Reading Year?
    LOUIS KASATKIN, The Black Horse Poets, Wakefield

  11. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 18 / 04 / 2005 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 12:00
    New schools’ venture for city is well-versed
    Updated on the18April 2005 10:44
    Published 18/04/2005 09:21

    By ALAN YORK
    A NEW joint venture aimed at bringing poetry into schools across the Wakefield diocese was being launched today.
    Poetry Wakefield is the idea of Cathedral poet-in-residence Louis Kasatkin, the Cathedral Poets and the Black Horse Poets, and is sponsored by Yorkshire Forward, the regional development agency.
    It takes the form of a quarterly booklet of poems and information about poetry and has won the full support of the Bishop of Wakefield, the Right Rev Stephen Platten, who has even written a verse which is included in the first issue. It goes:
    There was a young man of Cleckheaton
    Whose verses were not worth repeating
    For first he would swear
    Then fly into the air
    With rhymes that were no’but expleting.
    He said: “This is the sort of writing that Poetry Wakefield: City and Diocese will not encourage! But my doggerel limerick does draw attention to the need to encourage young poets in schools throughout the Diocese of Wakefield.
    Encourage
    “This, Louis Kastakin, the Cathedral Poets and others intend to encourage. Yorkshire Forward has given us financial support and so we hope to be given further support by other bodies too.
    “The production of a quarterly periodical will allow us to bring together the poetic talents of West Yorkshire and to encourage others to write. Who knows – even I may improve my versing if I become a regular reader.”
    The launch was being carried out at Treacy Hall at the Cathedral.
    Mr Kastakin, who has been poet-in-residence at the Cathedral since 2001, said: “This is another very real and tangible step in awakening the sleeping giant of poetry within schools and the local community.”
    The two poets’ groups have set a goal of establishing an annual ‘Gissing Prize for Schools’ named after Wakefield-born George Gissing, one of England’s leading 19th century writers.
    He was born in 1857 in Wakefield city centre in Thompson’s Yard, off Westgate.
    He died in 1904 having written 23 novels, one of which, A Life’s Morning, is set in a thinly-disguised Wakefield and was re-published in a limited edition by the Gissing Trust last yea r to mark the 100th anniversary of his death.
    In his hey day, Gissing was a literary superstar and his work still attracts devoted attention from academics, writers and readers around the world.
    Galleries
    Letters supporting a bid by the poets for Arts Council funding have been sent by Bishop Platten, former Wakefield MP David Hinchliffe, Wakefield Local Education Authority and the Wakefield Diocesan Board of Education.
    Local museums, galleries, libraries, the Cathedral and Ottakar’s bookstore will all stock the quarterly.

  12. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 08 / 06 / 2007 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 14:17
    Anti-Russia ‘bias’ by the BBC
    Published on the08June
    2007
    13:27

    The sooner the BBC is deprived of its licence fee the better. Why should the general public fund propaganda, the effects of which are clearly not in their material interest?
    I refer to Simon Mayo’s show on Radio 5 at about 1.45pm on Monday June 4. The broadcast purported to be a ‘discussion’ about current Russian foreign policy rhetoric. Never objective, never balanced, the BBC let the life-long slanderer and defamer of everything Russian, Robert Service, practically re-ignite the Cold War and all its paranoia with his unchallenged invective.

    Russia is neither Iraq nor the former democratic state of Federal Yugoslavia.

    Russia is unlikely to heed the venomous hypocrisy of the United States and its long-time lackey in Europe, the former ‘Great’ Britain.

    Behind the propaganda of the Cold War, anti-Russain racism lurked, now with that era long buried, there is no Communist bogeyman, only Russia and its multi-cultural, inclusive democrative society and people. When America and its pipsqueak henchman England, talk to Russia they are perhaps looking at the wrong map. Russia isn’t Iran, it will not allow itself to be bullied and eventually bombed into acquiescence.

    I have, naturally issued a formal complaint to the relevant BBC department about this reprehensible vilification of Russia.

    LOUIS KASATKIN

  13. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 07 / 12 / 2010 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 14:22
    Boy who kicked the hornet’s nest
    Published on the07December
    2010
    11:48

    THE current controversy surrounding the whistleblower website WikiLeaks appears to be taking on a surreal quality.
    The old adage that art imitates life and vice-versa could not be more apposite when the basic story outlines of the whole WikiLeaks saga are there for all to see.

    At the centre of it ,we have a Swedish investigative journalist, we also have highly confidential information, potentially damaging to various governments, thirdly we have the Swedish police launching an investigation into the journalist’s alleged sexual misconduct, which is denied by said journalist’s lawyer.

    Sounds familiar?

    With a change of name and a couple of details, what we have is the late Stieg Larsson’s Millenium Trilogy unfolding in real time and in the real world.

    The only distinction one can make between Swedich fiction and fact is that Larsson’s tale of Blomqvist and Salander were much more credible.

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

  14. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 30 / 07 /2011 : Yorkshire Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Monday, 31 March 2014 at 10:32
    A NIGHTCLUB has been criticised by Christian leaders after it was controversially named Religion, with club nights called Resurrection and Salvation.
    The Wakefield club also sells cocktails with names including Angel Wings.
    The club Religion opened its doors just a week ago but residents and local clergy have already shown their outrage at the decision to introduce themed nights called Monday Mass and Friday Salvation.
    Critics claim that there would be a widespread outcry if Muslim worship terms had been used to promote drinking and dancing.
    Angered residents say that the owners of the club are being disrespectful and insensitive to the Church and the Bishop of Wakefield, Stephen Platten, has deemed the club’s themes “inappropriate”.
    He said he was not against people enjoying themselves but he said he did think it was insensitive, adding: “There’s a whole host of topics they could have chosen.
    “Some of the names of the events are insensitive and inappropriate.
    “Religion is about taking life seriously. Would people have been amused if they’d called it health, which is an equally serious topic, and named some of the rooms A&E and gynaecology?”
    Bishop Platten added: “If any other aspect of people’s lives was taken and trivialised in this way I think people would be upset.
    “In particular, in this case, it affects Christian people.”

    The company which owns the club, Leisure 99, said the name of the club nights were not linked to any particular faith.
    In a statement, a company spokesman said: “The definition of the word religion is a pursuit or interest followed with great devotion, which is what partygoers in the city are doing.
    “We chose the term Resurrection for a Friday night, because the night-time economy’s suffering and we’re hoping to revive and revitalise it, as its definition suggests.
    “The same is true of Salvation, and the word Mass was chosen because it’s a massive Monday night of massive music.”

    Wakefield poet Louis Kasatkin, who helps forges links between the arts and the church, said it was easy to imagine the reaction if the club’s operators had used Muslim terms of worship.
    “But they appear to think using Christian theme terminology is okay.
    “My own view is that it is tantamount to breaching the law on religious hatred,” he added.

    Other political activists asserted the rights of free speech on both sides.
    Sean Gabb, director of the Libertarian Alliance, claimed that the owners of the club might be living under police protection had they been promoting club nights called Jihad or Ramadan.
    Dr Gabb suggested that Christians who are offended by what is offered should find out who is providing goods and services to the club, and publicly refuse to do business with them.

    footnote:- “Religion” went out of business in early 2013.

  15. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 26 / 06 / 2006 : Pontefract & Castleford Express
    By Louis Kasatkin on Monday, 31 March 2014 at 10:37
    Poet back at school
    Published on the22June 2006 11:03

    A POET went back to school with youngsters in Pontefract after the school holidays last week.
    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield Cathedral’s poet-in-residence, launched the new term with a
    poetry masterclass for youngsters at the Holy Family and St Michael’s School in Pontefract.
    He said: “It’s great to be back at a school where so much good poetry was produced this time last year.”
    Louis currently has a regular blog on http://www.wakefieldexpresstoday.co.uk
    and is in his third term as president of the Black Horse Poets.

  16. ARCHIVE MATERIAL :Gleaned from Tony Hannan’s Rugby League Archive
    By Louis Kasatkin on Monday, 31 March 2014 at 10:45
    February 26, 2010
    Wakefield’s poet-in-residence
    Super League programmes column – April 2000

    PARDON me for mentioning another magazine in these august pages (it isn’t August, it’s April – ed), but in the course of the week’s weft I happened across the latest Big Issue.

    The Big Issue, for those who are socially unaware, is the magazine/newspaper sold by homeless people on the streets of our towns and cities, with a view to them “helping themselves” as Carol’s Victorian dad Samuel Smilies might have put it. Anyroad, in the latest edition there is a magnificent profile of a poet by somebody called Ally Fogg. And not just any poet either. Step forward Wakefield Trinity Wildcats’ latest signing Louis Kasatkin.

    Now Louis, for those of you who know about fanzines and stuff, used to edit Castleford’sRebel Yell, but these days he can be found wandering lonely as a Lancashire Lynx supporter at Belle Vue. He is, in short, Wakefield’s poet-in-residence. Whether that mean he lives permanently in the East Stand is anybody’s guess, but what is certain is that he is now officially in charge of putting together the odd quatrain or two on behalf of the Wakey faithful. Or, as Louis himself puts it, to “apply semiotics to the cultural struggle of northern England.”

    Just what an inedible milk pudding has to do with anything I don’t know, but what I do know is that this a very entertaining piece and well worth a look if you can grab a copy. My regular readers in the Wildcats programme will already know of Louis’s writings, given that he has a regular column – Umberto Eco’s Ashtray – a bit nearer the front of The Wildcat than mine. And as we speak he is probably ambling gaily over yonder scoreboard end, gazing at an open canto, hand on forehead, pondering the futility of man’s existence and whether the refs have got it in for Andy Kelly’s men or not.

    “(Rugby League) is not the most obvious arena to exercise the most ethereal and effete literary form,” writes Fogg. “But then think of The Iliad or The Charge of the Light Brigade- an epic rendering of heroic battles – and it begins to make some kind of sense. Or as much sense as anything makes in the company of Kasatkin.”

    Louis, I’m happy to report, is ever so slightly potty. Once upon a time he wrote as Rugby League correspondent for Leeds’ Other Paper – which I also had a cartoon or two in myself – his pieces packed with classical allusions and surreal jokes. How about this? “Heroes and warrior princes, deeds fabled in inexhaustible eidolon, their countenances resplendent with mythic grandeur, return to the Casus Belli.” Eh? Now I’m not thick. I can do the Suncrossword. But something just went flying over my head and it wasn’t a Steve McNamara penalty attempt.

    If Louis serves any purpose at all though, it is that he vigorously splatters those old Rugby League stereotypes on the wall of, er, life. We are not all whippet rearing, pigeon fancying, flat cap wearing, dour, miserable sods, are we?

    “Poetry and rugby are both part of the continuing fabric of cultural expression…,” he opines. “They give meaning. Whether the fans or the audience are enthralled by it is neither here nor there. The point is it has been performed. It has been internalised, consumed, made sense of, and something is gained by it. That’s all it ever is.”

    Quite.

  17. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 02 / 04 / 2014 : Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Thursday, 3 April 2014 at 10:12
    Lacklustre view of UK education
    I FELT heartbroken after reading your article about the school that will be teaching its own pupils English as a foreign language. Then again, I ought not to have been too disappointed, given the 60 years long unending deterioration and implosion of teaching standards and academic attainments in the UK. My own experience, albeit as a pupil disadvantaged in a far more institutionally racist and pupil-on-pupil bullying educational culture than would be tolerated let alone imagined today, calls into question the lacklustre and appeasing nature of UK education in general as exemplified by the school in your article.
    Being of Austrian/Russian parentage and speaking only German at home, actually made me bilingual at the age of five and drove me to be top of the class in English year after year. Given the far less arduous welcome from their hosts these days, I cannot understand why the children of incomers are assumed to “need” additional privileges. A lack of institutional will and purpose and the UK being the only EU member not to insist on linguistic competence as a condition of residency is the true source of the problem.

    Louis Kasatkin, Founder of Destiny Poets,

  18. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL : 04 / 04 /2014 : Wakefield Express
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 5 April 2014 at 10:25
    Letter – Fragility of the world order
    Published on the04April 2014 12:42

    The continuing international diplomatic turmoil and tension surrounding Russia’s necessary and proportionate actions over the catastrophic developments in Ukraine are a reminder of the fragility of the world order.
    A legitimate and democratically elected Ukrainian government and its President are driven from office and forced into involuntary exile by a wave of inter-connected mass demonstrations and occupations largely driven by acknowledged openly fascist/racist organisations.
    One of the prominent leaders of that wave of anarchic, civil insurrections was reported as having been assassinated and as result his followers have sworn vengeance against the interim and far from constitutionally legitimate regime currently in power in Kiev.
    Quite how the USA and its coterie of EU and NATO lackeys, our country amongst them, can assert any apparent ‘moral’ authority in such a complex and dangerous political impasse is bewildering to say the least.
    Having been stymied by the rest of the world in its desire to bomb and or invade Syria, the economically crippled western capitalist states have once again demonstrated their monumentally calamitous judgement in seeking to impose their squalid and indefensible solution upon Russia.
    This of course has not the slightest chance of succeeding in what the rest of the world recognises and understands as the realm of Realpolitik.
    What with proven criminal psychopaths, murderers, anti-semites, racists, fascists, supporters of the Waffen SS and dangerous ideologues all backed by NATO who wish only to impose European Central Bank austerity measures on their own people as the price for EU entry; clearly it’s time for our own vainglorious and impotent “leaders” to shut up and sit down.

    Louis Kasatkin

  19. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 25 / 04 /14 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Tuesday, 29 April 2014 at 10:49
    How Christian are PM’s values?
    IN MAINSTREAM media, there are, at least anecdotally, what the professionals refer to in the time honoured fashion as “slow news days“. The British tabloid press in particular, though the broadsheets too, succumb to “the silly season”. Offbeat, eccentric stories are magically conjured up out of the ether to occupy vast acreages of otherwise empty news space.
    And here’s the latest such non-event, non-news even by petty bourgeois corporate standards and all its vacuity.
    The British Prime Minister has taken to asserting his attachment/allegiance to the Christian faith rather more volubly than heretofore has been the case. I could resort, legitimately to recounting the ongoing austerity measures and persecutions of the socially and economically marginalised. Because clearly they are manifestly anti-Christian. Then again, comedic irony is a much subtler weapon to deploy against the likes of Cameron in situations such as this. And Cameron has proven the best destroyer of his own, if he ever had any, credibility. He’s a Christian? Then One Direction are talented musicians.
    There, that wasn’t too harsh was it – not for Easter.
    Louis Kasatkin (Christian)

  20. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 13 / 05 / 2014 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 at 10:06
    Powerful truth in Orwell’s 1984
    People generally desire the world and society to be “fair” and for governments and those in authority to exercise “justice”.
    The same people often believe that with a sufficient amount of “moral” argument and peaceful protest the apparent injustices and wrongs can somehow be reformed away by reasoned argument; by, for instance, the use of facts and figures and tales of woe and misery that those in authority have perhaps, inadvertently inflicted upon them and those who oppress them can then somehow become their friends.
    Why are you being persecuted, oppressed, marginalised, demonised and being made to feel less than fully human?
    Orwell wrote this, and alas for all the naive ones out there, it is an immutable truth.
    “Power is not a means, it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power.” – 1984, by George Orwell

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

  21. A very brief history of Leeds Other Paper ( gleaned from google group archives circa Oct.1999 )
    By Louis Kasatkin on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 at 10:20
    the head of music then was a rather toothsome young lady called AnnScanlon, who eventually went on to write for the Times and most of themajor music papers. The editor then was a splendid bloke called JohnBoocock, who eventually became a teacher in the Orkney Islands. Otherswho I knew there included photographer (and undisputed king of theliggers) Tony Woolgar, who’s still very active on the Leeds music scene,and a guy called Louis Kasatkin (sp?) who wrote highly idiosyncraticrugby league reports under the name “The Man In The Stand”. Heinvariably referred to his beloved Castleford as “The Legion OfLagentium”. We used to have meetings in the Adelphi on Hunslet Road onFriday evenings.After John Boocock left, IMHO the paper lost something as the editorialdirection moved away from grass-roots issues to more general articlesfor the Volvo and muesli set. There were still some excellent interviewsbut that sense of community activism had gone. Some of it survived in agrand little weekly called the Spen Valley Spark, a paper run by EricLawson, the former (old, not New!) Labour member of Kirklees council.I left in 1987, due to a mixture of ideological differences with the newteam, and the fact that I had just got some work down in Cambridge.Whatever the case, it was a sad day when the LOP (by then, the NorthernStar, renamed after the 1830’s Chartist paper IIRC) rolled off the pressfor the final time in 1991.

    > There is a “Man in The Stand” that writes match reports for the LUFC > fanzine “the sqaure Ball”. Is it the same bloke, or is the pseudonym a> tribute?

    Not sure if it’s Louis or not. While he’d pop along to Elland Road occasionally, it was rugby league rather than football that was his great passion. If I was to read one of these match reports I’d knowimmediately. If it reads like it was written by a cross between aprofessor of history and BBC Radio 5’s Stuart Hall – then it’s Louis’work all right.

  22. Wakefield Wildcats Poet-in-Residence ARCHIVE MATERIAL 18 / 11/ 1999 Birmingham Evening Mail
    By Louis Kasatkin on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 at 10:31
    Team gets all poetic about rugby

    Birmingham Evening Mail (England)
    November 18, 1999 | Copyright

    A RUGBY league side are looking to improve their fortunes with a new signing – a poet.
    Wakefield Trinity Wildcats are poised to appoint poet Louis Kasatkin to help them on the pitch and on the terraces at their Belle Vue stadium.
    As the West Yorkshire club’s poet laureate, he is expected to encourage the players on the team bus as well as deliver prose on special occasions.
    Mr Kasatkin is due to meet the club tomorrow and a club spokesman said they expect to hold a news conference next week.
    The poet said: “It will be interesting to see how sport and art mix together.
    Gentler
    “I’m not going to be banging out 10 lines of doggerel every week – I see it more as a Poet Laureate-type appointment for special occasions. …

  23. Cathedral Poet-in-Residence ; ARCHIVE MATERIAL 16 / 06 /2005 Wakefield Express
    By Louis Kasatkin on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 at 10:42
    Youngsters have a way with words at cathedral
    Updated on the16June 2005 10:12
    Published 09/06/2005 13:15

    GETTING out of bed and making your breakfast may not inspire you to write a poem but, according to Wakefield Cathedral poet Louis Kasatkin, simple everyday life can provide the basis to express yourself through poetry.
    Like many people I have not written a poem since I was at school so when I was asked to join a group of children from Pinderfields Hospital School for a poetry workshop at the cathedral I had no idea what to expect.
    The group of 11 to 16-years-olds looked as nervous at the prospect of writing poetry as I felt, but our fears were soon put aside when Mr Kasatkin encouraged us to start our poems with what we had done that morning.
    Surrounded by the grand interior of the cathedral the unique setting played its part in inspiring the budding young wordsmiths and they were soon scribbling on their notepads.
    Pinderfields Hospital School English teacher, Jeanette Burkey, said: “Some of them have been doing poetry in the past few weeks and we thought that the setting of the cathedral would provide inspiration.
    “It is not about whether they write brilliant poetry, it is about getting them to respond.
    “I think just being in this place is a good experience for them. It’s the kind of place they’d never come to on their own.”
    I found the poetry written by the group poignant because it reflected their everyday experiences and showed their youth. One pupil, 14-year-old Redeana Hammill, wrote about being woken up every day with a call from her best friend and dancing around her bedroom to teen pop group Busted.
    Mark Strickleton, 16, of Crofton, began his poem with the words: “I can feel at ease. I do not have to fear when in this atmosphere.” He said: “It has been interesting. It is nice to think of ways to express how I feel. It’s not something you do every day. It makes a nice change.”
    Like many of his schoolmates 15-year-old Jamie Leonard had never visited the cathedral before the workshop. He said: “It is my first time in the cathedral. It’s an inspiring place, the size of it is amazing.”
    As suggested by Mr Kasatkin, Jamie used what had happened to him that morning for inspiration. He wrote: “I woke up this morning and knew this day wouldn’t be boring. The birds were singing and the sun was shining.”
    Mr Kasatkin and the Wakefield Cathedral Poets have been running poetry workshops at the cathedral for four years. He said: “You usually find a lot of the kids have never been here before. It is a new experience and something out of the ordinary. It is up to them what they make of it afterwards.
    “I do think it helps them express their anxieties, fears and experiences. Because it is new and different it is a change they respond to.
    “This is what we offer in Wakefield. I have been to churches on the continent and they have nothing like this going on. There are places with more history which are not doing what we are doing. Wakefield Cathedral has the X-factor.”

  24. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 30 / 05 / 2014 Wakefield Express
    By Louis Kasatkin on Friday, 30 May 2014 at 10:20
    Letter – Political parties in disarray after ‘wind of change’
    Published on the30May 2014 09:18

    The European elections of 2014 have turned out to be the most important political event in modern European history since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.
    The wholly liberating and welcome results have left the moribund established political parties in complete disarray.
    To paraphrase a previous British Prime Minister, Harold MacMillan, the Wind of Change is blowing across this benighted continent.
    Even amidst their own humiliating defeat, our three major parties choose to act as lackeys of a remote alien regime and not as the loyal servants of the sovereign British electorate.
    One thing remains certain, as Harold MacMillan noted of those resisting inevitable reform in Africa, for them it would never be a glad, confident morning ever again. Schadenfreude was never this good.
    Louis Kasatkin

  25. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 23 / 05 /2014 Wakefield Express
    By Louis Kasatkin on Saturday, 31 May 2014 at 10:37
    Why don’t we get critically acclaimed films at Cineworld Wakefield?
    Published on the20May 2014 09:52

    You will be aware that Wakefield is the UK’s 11th largest city with a population in the region of 300,000.
    Now,I don’t know if facts such as that have any bearing on how decisions are made by Cineworld in how they treat the cinema-going public and how poorly they actually serve their potential customer base.
    Wakefield consistently misses out on a whole range of films that usually have a screening at Castleford Cineworld but are never shown at Wakefield.
    For instance most recently and currently: “Tracks”, “Locke”, “Blue Ruin”, ”Inside Llewyn Davis” to mention a few critically acclaimed films which have received widespread glowing reviews.
    Clearly quality and good press reviews are also not a factor taken into account; while unwilling or unable to treat its customer base with respect, Wakefield managed to screen the following critically panned and negatively reviewed, “Labor Day” and ”Brick Mansions” amongst a whole roster of dross.
    Louis Kasatkin

  26. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 05 / 06 / 2014 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Monday, 9 June 2014 at 10:01
    Euro election result welcome

    THE EUROPEAN elections of 2014 have turned out to be the most important political event in modern European history since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.
    The wholly liberating and welcome results have left the moribund established political parties in complete disarray.
    To paraphrase a previous British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, “the wind of change is blowing across this benighted continent”.
    Even amidst their own humiliating defeat, our three major parties choose to act as lackeys of a remote alien regime and not as the loyal servants of the sovereign British electorate.
    One thing remains certain, as Harold Macmillan noted of those resisting inevitable reform in Africa, for them it would never be a glad, confident morning ever again.
    Schadenfreude was never this good.

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

  27. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 04 / 07 / 2014 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Friday, 4 July 2014 at 10:39
    Failure to tackle jobs agencies

    The announcement from the coalition on the banning of exclusivity clauses in zero hour contracts represents a very modest step in the right direction.
    Nevertheless, it underlines this and previous adminstrations’ moral cowardice in their failure to confront their friends in the lucrative, closed world of personnel recruitment agencies.
    The devastating blight which private employment agencies and their version of medieval serfdom have wreaked upon our national economic life over the decades is as great as existed prior to the abolition of slavery.
    The abolition of slavery, the most iniquitous form of labour-capital relations, was hastened by the intervention of moral individuals who campaigned for such an abolition.
    Alas, for our present generation of political representatives and their supine cronies in the media, they embody Edmund Burke’s dictum – that in order for evil to triumph it is only necessary that good men do nothing.
    And it is clear that politicians in this present age are indeed doing nothing about zero hours contracts.

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

  28. Public Correspondence ; ARCHIVE MATERIAL 22 / 07 /2014 Yorkshire Evening Post
    By Louis Kasatkin on Wednesday, 23 July 2014 at 10:03
    Jobs growth is propaganda

    The current industrial relations dispute affecting Argos and its workforce ought not to come as a surprise to those who understand the present abysmal state of the UK economy.
    The empty rhetoric of coalition propaganda about ‘jobs growth’ and supposedly record levels of people in jobs belies the stark fact that the UK’s Gross Domestic Product has shown no signs whatsoever of any increase in productivity since 2007.
    Beset by an endemic wages freeze and actual devaluation year on year through inflation, workers in the UK are being continually de-incentivised and so are not ‘producing’ any more. It is imperative that the scandal of zero-hours contracts are made a prime election issue and that the trades union movement and all progressive, enlightened and socially responsible organisations call for them to be abolished.
    It is to the credit of the workers at Argos that they have said that enough is enough.

    Louis Kasatkin, The Campaign Against Zero-Hours Contracts, Wakefield

  29. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 02 / 12 / 14 Yorkshire Evening Post

    Too late to deal with migration

    Such have been effects of the decades-long duration and intensity of intellectual dishonesty and prohibition surrounding the pressing issues of immigration, that is has rendered impossible any political action required to now belatedly deal with those issues.

    Which, given these isles’ romantic and historic attachment to values of liberty and free speech that had always kept us safe from continental political tyrannies throughout the centuries is, to say the least, sad and disheartening.

    It’s as if all that our forefathers fought for and believed in turned out to be a mere fiction.

    In that respect ,those on the traditional “Left” are equally as guilty of intellectual pretension and dishonesty as all the rest.

    Why, for instance, does the organised trades union and Labour movement persist in advocating and supporting intensified labour market competition which always acts to drive down real wages?

    How on earth in the real economic world does support and encouragement of unrestricted cross-border EU migration help to maintain or defend, let alone improve, wages and conditions?

    As someone of Austrian and Russian parentage, I have always puzzled over the curious British antipathy toward the poor and those who have been marginalised by society.

    As the Czech ambassador remarked on the radio the other day while discussing inner EU migration “it concentrates on those central and east europeans who have come over here to occupy your jobs.”

    Only foreigners can discuss immigration and, for my two penn’orth, it’s been a historic disaster of cataclysmic proportions.

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

  30. Public Correspondence ARCHIVE MATERIAL 20 / 11 /14 Yorkshire Post

    Abolish these zero-hours contracts now
    Published on the
    20 November
    2014
    02:37

    From: Louis Kasatkin, Pinderfields Road, Wakefield.

    ED Miliband’s “Victorian management practices” speech reveals a gap, the width of the Grand Canyon, in politicians’ and media commentators’ understanding of what the reality is of being on a zero-hours contract.

    In my own case for example: at the end of September, I signed with an agency to do regular night shifts with a major supermarket chain. I was given the assurance that this supermarket chain “does not do zero hours contracts” and neither did this agency apparently.

    Four weeks into my contract, of a guaranteed minimum of three shifts a week, the agency, by daily text message, cancelled eight consecutive shifts that I had been due to work. With my last wage being for only two days worked the previous week and no surety of future income, I was forced to immediately re-apply for JSA, and Housing Benefit. All that on top of threats and intimidation from my landlord.

    From November 4-17, I had precisely one week’s JSA to subsist on. From my Christian standpoint, zero-hours contracts are utterly morally abhorrent and any politicians or commentator who says different needs to examine their own conscience.

    Some 200 years ago, politicians and informed opinion dithered and delayed inexcusably over the abolition of slavery. Slavery no doubt offered certain businesses labour force flexibility much as serfdom once did and zero-hours do now.

    As a member of a supposedly ordered and enlightened society which the UK still harbours pretensions of being, I, for my part, will no longer allow myself be treated as human garbage or to be lied to by agencies and employers nor to be threatened and intimidated by private landlords. Zero-hours contracts must be abolished, not 10 years from now, but now.

  31. Public Correspondence ARCHIVE MATERIAL 26 / 11 / 2014 Lancashire Evening Post

    Reality of a zero hours lifestyle

    Ed Miliband’s “Victorian management practices” speech reveals a gap, the width of the Grand Canyon, in politicians’ and media commentators’ understanding of what the reality is of being on a zero-hours contract.

    In my own case, for example, at the end of September, I signed with an agency to do regular night shifts with a major supermarket chain.

    I was given the assurance that this supermarket chain “does not do zero-hours contracts” and neither did this agency apparently.

    Four weeks into my contract, of a guaranteed minimum of three shifts a week, the agency, by daily text message, cancelled eight consecutive shifts that I had been due to work.

    With my last wage being for only two days worked the previous week and no surety of future income, I was forced to immediately re-apply for both Jobseekers Allowance, and Housing Benefit.

    All that on top of threats and intimidation from my landlord. From November 4 to 17, I had precisely one week’s Jobseekers Allowance to subsist on.

    From my Christian standpoint, zero-hours contracts are utterly morally abhorrent.

    Some 200 years ago, politicians and informed opinion dithered and delayed inexcusably over the abolition of slavery.

    Zero-hours contracts must be abolished, not 10 years from now, but now.

    Louis Kasatkin, address supplied

  32. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 19 / 01 / 2015 Yorkshire Post

    January 19: Morrisons’ predicament was obvious
    Published on the
    18 January
    2015
    16:18
    Print this
    Sponsored by

    Express Bi-folding Doors
    0 comments
    Be the first to comment

    From: Louis Kasatkin, Pinderfields Road, Wakefield.

    I AM somewhat taken aback by the “gasp, shock horror” response that has accompanied the disastrous end of year results posted by Morrisons (The Yorkshire Post, January 14). Why was anyone even the slightest bit surprised? Or was it more of a question of no one in the know actually bothering to keep their eye on the ball?

    Back in September, I was set on by a local employment agency as a warehouse operative at Morrisons Junction 41 Distribution Centre. I was guaranteed that this was not a zero hours contract and that in any event I would be guaranteed three shifts per week and in practice would be working five most weeks.

    After four weeks, the agency I had signed up with began cancelling my shifts on a daily basis. The senior manager emphatically denied that there was any drop-off in business, and it was a matter between my agency and me regarding the numbers of shifts. Clearly one of them was not telling the truth. Either business volumes at the distribution centre were low or I was being fobbed off. Well, we all know now, don’t we?

  33. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 18 / 02 / 2015 Yorkshire Evening Post

    Invidious zero hours contracts
    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield
    Of all the injustices being visited upon the electorate during this seemingly unending period of government-induced austerity, zero hours contracts and their proliferation as supported by the major parties is perhaps the most invidious.
    Zero hours contracts are a desperate and amoral strategy designed to maximise the impoverishment and destitution of the increasing numbers of people becoming dependent upon them.
    Terms and conditions of employment which would once have been deemed unacceptable in the third world are now the norm in our country.
    When slavery was the economic issue of the day 200 years ago, tinkering with it and appeasing the slave owners in industry did not get slavery abolished.
    Neither will tinkering with zero hours contracts nor schmoozing with the rapacious profiteering staffing agencies rid us of this present day social evil.

  34. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 20 / 02 /2015 Yorkshire Post
    It is plainly obvious that in general, the mainstream media and the major political parties are choosing to neglect the burning issue around Zero Hours Contracts. Of all the inhumanity and injustices being visited upon the electorate during this seemingly unending period of government-induced Austerity , ,Zero Hours Contracts and their proliferation as supported by the major parties is perhaps the most invidious and discriminatory example of the general inhumanity and injustice destroying our Society here in 21st.century Britain. Capitalism ,aka “the free market” as an economic system is already moribund and wholly incapable of any meaningful recovery.30 million “officially” unemployed across the equally moribund and useless European Union bear daily testimony to that. Zero Hours Contracts as operated by wholly unaccountable private staffing agencies in collusion with the major employers which they supply with casualised,minimum-waged labour is a blight on Society and should not enjoy the protection of the Law let alone the support and indulgence of the organised Trades Union and Labour movement. Zero Hours Contracts are intrinsically a desperate and insidiously amoral strategy designed to maximise the impoverishment and destitution of those increasing numbers of people becoming dependent upon them. terms and conditions of employment which would once have been deemed unacceptable in the Third world are now the norm in our country. When Slavery was the economic issue of the day 200 years ago,tinkering with it and appeasing the slave owners in industry did not get slavery abolished. Neither will tinkering with Zero Hours Contracts nor schmoozing with the rapacious profiteering staffing agencies rid us of this present day social evil.

  35. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 13 / 03 / 2015 Yorkshire Evening Post

    Louis Kasatkin, Wakefield

    John Appleyard claims that “immigration is a working class issue” (Your Feedback, March 7). This is a non sequitur.

    Immigration is merely the mechanism, in practice, of supplying a labour force surplus to actual requirements.

    It inevitably reduces the local price of labour and creates and maintains a surplus army of labour which in turn reinforces the reduction in the general level of wages for decades.

    Mass immigration therefore has by its own capitalist logic been and continues to be a marvellous success story. Only not for the 99 per cent of us who have been on the receiving end of this social engineering project of the EU.

    Why the “left” continue to support unrestricted mass immigration and treats these additional workers as somehow especially reverent, whether from inside the EU or not, remains a mystery only they can possibly explain.

  36. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 04 / 04 /2015 Yorkshire Evening Post ( Print Version Only )

    To yep.newsdesk@ypn.co.uk Apr 3 at 11:47 AM
    Sir -media coverage and management of the General Election 2015 has albeit for one day only,focused on the issue of Zero Hours Contracts ! The Parties showed no discernible difference on the substance of the issue itself,which was hardly surprising albeit that various of their leading stooges affirmed that THEY would have difficulty in trying to live on a zero hours contract. To reiterate the barebones facts which even Labour and Tory and Liberal do not contest. The Office of National Statistics shows that workers on Zero Hours Contracts work on average only 23 hours per week,as indeed has been my own experience these last 2 years. 58 % of workers on Zero Hours Contracts have been with their current employer for over a year,and being offered a measly 1 or 2 shifts per week is not uncommon.. It is estimated that there are now some 1.8 million contracts in the UK that do not guarantee any hours-with as many as one in seven jobs now zero hours. It is no surprise therefore that in spite of more people in work,the UK’s Gross Domestic Product is still below the level it was at immediately prior to the Banking Crisis of 2007. All zero Hours contracts are exploitative ,abolition is the only sensible response.

    Sincerely,
    Louis Kasatkin

  37. Public Correspondence : ARCHIVE MATERIAL 10 / 04 /2015 Wakefield Express

    11:15Sunday 12 April 2015
    2
    HAVE YOUR SAY
    Media coverage and management of the General Election 2015 has albeit for one day only,focused on the issue of Zero Hours Contracts.

    The parties showed no discernible difference on the substance of the issue itself,which was hardly surprising albeit that various of their leading stooges affirmed that THEY would have difficulty in trying to live on a zero hours contract.

    To reiterate the barebones facts which even Labour and Tory and Liberal do not contest.

    The Office of National Statistics shows that workers on Zero Hours Contracts work on average only 23 hours per week,as indeed has been my own experience these past two years. A total of 58 per cent of workers on Zero Hours Contracts have been with their current employer for more than a year,and being offered a measly one or two shifts per week is not uncommon.. It is estimated that there are now some 1.8 million contracts in the UK that do not guarantee any hours-with as many as one in seven jobs now zero hours. It is no surprise therefore that in spite of more people in work,the UK’s Gross Domestic Product is still below the level it was at immediately prior to the Banking Crisis of 2007. All Zero Hours contracts are exploitative ,abolition is the only sensible response.

    Louis Kasatkin

    Pinderfields Road

  38. #DestinyPoetsUK #LouisKasatkin #WakefieldPoetInResidence
    http://www.destinypoets.co.uk
    ** EVERYWHERE **
    Board of Senior Editors:
    Louis Kasatkin
    Writer, Poet, Editor, Administrator
    Destiny Poet
    U.K.

    http://www.setumag.com/2017/07/Louis-Kasatkin-Poetry.html
    http://www.setumag.com/2017/04/Louis-Kasatkin-Poetry.html
    http://www.setumag.com/2017/01/poem-by-louis-kasatkin.html
    http://episteme.net.in/index.php/392/june_2017.html
    http://episteme.net.in/index.php/393/march_2017.html
    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=151:poetry&Itemid=595 September 2016

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=137:poetry&Itemid=628 June 2016

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=122:poetry&Itemid=627 March 2016

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=109:poetry&Itemid=626 December 2015

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=104:poetry&Itemid=625 September 2015

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=89:poems&Itemid=624 June 2015

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=81:poetry-special&Itemid=620 March 2015

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=67:poems&Itemid=622 December 2014

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=58:poems&Itemid=619 September 2014

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=15:poems&Itemid=611 June 2014

    http://www.episteme.net.in/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=1&Itemid=601 March 2014

    Edit

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s